Dynamic Sensor tables

Dynamic Sensor Tables

The data for each dynamic sensor is stored in a separate table having the same name as the sensor. These tables have been set up to store the pavement response data from a plane traversing the test section. This is referred to as an Event. The field Event# is the common key between all dynamic tables. This system was set up to reflect the fact that when a plane loads the pavement (an event) only a few of the sensors are actually triggered. There is no need to store the data from non-triggered sensors.

 

Aircraft Tables

These tables store data regarding information known about the plane that created an event .

Name Description
EVENT# Increment of aircraft event data stored in the database. Example '58' indicates the 58 th. event stored in the database
DATETIME Date and time with the following format Year/Julian Day/Hour/Minute. Example '19953451415' indicates the 345 th day of 1995 at 14:15 (2:15 pm).
SECONDS Seconds at which event occured. To be used with Date and Time values.
AIRCRAFT# Official aircraft number. US airplanes all start with N. Example 'N40'.
AIRCRAFTWEIGHT Aircraft weight in pounds (lbs).
CARRIER Airline Name. Example 'NW' for Northwest airlines
NVALIDIR Number of valid Infrared Sensors
V0 Aircraft velocity in ft/sec
ACCEL Aircraft acceleration in ft/sec^2
YPOSITION Aircraft offset position with respect to runway centerline. Values are in Feet.
NOTE Field left open for specific comments about this event
ACPICTURE Aircraft picture when available

H-bar strain gages and Dynamic Carlson strain gages.

The two types of strain gage tables are set up to collect the resulting dynamic strain response of the pavement structure

Name Description
EVENT# Event Number corresponds to the sequential numbering of aircraft events stored in the database.
TINTERVAL Time interval between data points. In seconds.
TSTART Start Time (sec) at which valid record has been reduced and stored in the database.
TEND End Time (sec) at which valid record has been reduced and stored in the database.
FILTERFREQ Frequency of data collection for this event. In Hertz.
NPEAKS umber of peaks identified in the record
OFFSETLEFT Baseline value before aircraft strain induced could be detected by this sensor. Baseline values change as a measurement of pavement response to longer environmental conditions. Values are in micro-inch/inch.
OFFSETRIGHT Baseline value after passage of the aircraft. In pure elastic mode, offsetright Baseline values should equal offsetleft baseline values. Values are in micro-inch/inch.
TIME1 Time (sec) of first peak.
PEAK1 First peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME2 Time (sec) of second peak (if present)
PEAK2 Second peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME3 Time (sec) of third peak (if present)
PEAK3 Third peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME4 Time (sec) of first peak (if present)
PEAK4 Fourth peak value (micro-inch/inch)
NOTE Field for specific remarks regarding this sensor

LVDT Tables

These tables store dynamic vertical displacements collected in the three layers of the pavement structure

Name Description
EVENT# Event Number corresponds to the sequential numbering of aircraft events stored in the database.
TINTERVAL Time interval between data points. In seconds.
TSTART Start Time (sec) at which valid record has been reduced and stored in the database.
TEND End Time (sec) at which valid record has been reduced and stored in the database.
FILTERFREQ Frequency of data collection for this event. In Hertz.
NPEAKS umber of peaks identified in the record
OFFSETLEFT Baseline value before aircraft strain induced could be detected by this sensor. Baseline values change as a measurement of pavement response to longer environmental conditions. Values are in micro-inch/inch.
OFFSETRIGHT Baseline value after passage of the aircraft. In pure elastic mode, offsetright Baseline values should equal offsetleft baseline values. Values are in micro-inch/inch.
TIME1 Time (sec) of first peak.
PEAK1 First peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME2 Time (sec) of second peak (if present)
PEAK2 Second peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME3 Time (sec) of third peak (if present)
PEAK3 Third peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME4 Time (sec) of first peak (if present)
PEAK4 Fourth peak value (micro-inch/inch)
NOTE Field for specific remarks regarding this sensor

Event Records Tables

Specific values from meaningful sensor response (for that event) are stored in these tables.

Name Description
EVENT# Event Number corresponds to the sequential numbering of aircraft events stored in the database.
SENSOR# Sensor numbers corresponds to the sensors that were trigerred during the event and which recorded at least one peak
EVENTRECORD For a triggered sensor: the before triggering baseline value, the peak(s), and after triggering baseline values are stored in the database

Position Strain Gage Tables

Name Description
EVENT# Event Number corresponds to the sequential numbering of aircraft events stored in the database.
TINTERVAL Time interval between data points. In seconds.
TSTART Start Time (sec) at which valid record has been reduced and stored in the database.
TEND End Time (sec) at which valid record has been reduced and stored in the database.
FILTERFREQ Frequency of data collection for this event. In Hertz.
NPEAKS umber of peaks identified in the record
OFFSETLEFT Baseline value before aircraft strain induced could be detected by this sensor. Baseline values change as a measurement of pavement response to longer environmental conditions. Values are in micro-inch/inch.
OFFSETRIGHT Baseline value after passage of the aircraft. In pure elastic mode, offsetright Baseline values should equal offsetleft baseline values. Values are in micro-inch/inch.
TIME1 Time (sec) of first peak.
PEAK1 First peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME2 Time (sec) of second peak (if present)
PEAK2 Second peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME3 Time (sec) of third peak (if present)
PEAK3 Third peak value (micro-inch/inch)
TIME4 Time (sec) of first peak (if present)
PEAK4 Fourth peak value (micro-inch/inch)
NOTE Field for specific remarks regarding this sensor

 

 

Contact the Project Lead: Dr. David Brill, Airport R&D


Last Update: 05/18/09